Accomplishments as of June 30, 2020

Since its passage in 2017, Senate Bill 1 has helped transportation efforts across California. Ranging from statewide asset management maintenance, to localized projects and programming, SB 1 is a potent driver in helping restore our vital transportation infrastructure. Here’s a closer at look at how it’s making a difference in myriad of ways. Please see below for program specific accomplishments as of June 30, 2020.

State Highway System Improvements State Highway System Improvements

Senate Bill 1, the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, was signed into law on April 28, 2017. This legislative package invests $54 billion over the next decade to fix roads, freeways and bridges in communities across California and puts more dollars toward transit and safety.

SB1 requires the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to meet the following performance outcomes by the end of 2027:

  • 98 percent of pavement in good or fair condition
  • 90 percent of culverts in good or fair condition
  • 90 percent of transportation management system units in good condition
  • 500 or more bridges fixed

Accomplishments

  • In the 3 years since the passage of SB 1, Caltrans has improved the condition of 6,400 lane miles of highway pavement in California exceeding projections.
  • In the same time period, Caltrans has fixed 635 bridges. This reflects an increase of almost 300 bridges above what would have been possible without the funding provided by SB 1.
  • Caltrans continues to make progress on the commitments made in SB1 including:
    • Over 540,791 linear feet of culverts have been improved.
    • 2,557 TMS locations have also been improved

Trade Corridor Enhancement Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP)

The TCEP was established by SB 1 to provide funding for infrastructure improvements on federally designated Trade Corridors of National and Regional Significance, on the National Highway Freight Network as identified in the California Freight Mobility Plan, and along other corridors with a high volume of freight movement. TCEP is a competitive program managed by the California Transportation Commission (CTC) and with Caltrans performing administrative and oversight responsibilities. TCEP provides funding for projects that enhance the movement of goods along corridors with high freight volume. SB 1 requires that projects nominated for this program be identified in an adopted Regional Transportation Plan and, if applicable, to be consistent with a sustainable communities’ strategy determined by the California Air Resources Board to achieve the region’s greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. Eligible projects’ elements may include improvements to state highways, local roads, freight rail systems, port facilities, truck corridors, Intelligent Transportation Systems, and environmental/ community mitigation. The program of projects is adopted by the CTC through a competitive process.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

SB 1 created this program with SB 1 funds and leveraged additional funds from the National Highway Freight Program.

For additional information please see the CTC's Trade Corridor Enhancement Program page.

Accomplishments

10 construction contracts have been awarded and will achieve these benefits:

  • 42.05 mixed flow lane miles
  • 41.4 HOV/HOT lane miles
  • 22 turn pockets constructed
  • 21 operational improvements
  • 11 bridges repaired
  • 6 interchange improvements
  • 4.77 miles of operational improvements
  • 3.22 auxiliary lane miles
  • 2 new bridges
  • 1.7 miles of new track
  • 1.27 rehabilitated lane-miles
  • 0.9 miles of collector distributors
  • 0.75 miles of sound walls

Solutions for Congested Corridors Solutions for Congested Corridors Program (SCCP)

SB 1 created this program with the goal to fund projects that reduce congestion throughout the State and provide more transportation choices while preserving the character of local communities and create opportunities for neighborhood enhancement. SB 1 requires that preference be given to comprehensive corridor plans that demonstrate collaboration between Caltrans and local or regional partners, reflecting a comprehensive planning approach. Examples of projects funded with SCCP are: improvements to state highways, local streets and roads, rail facilities, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and restoration or preservation work that protects critical local habitat or open space. The program of projects is adopted by the CTC through a competitive process. The CTC manages this program and Caltrans performs administrative and oversight program responsibilities.

Projects in this program are expected to achieve benefits in these categories:

  • Congestion
  • Safety
  • Air pollution and greenhouse gas emission reductions
  • Economic development, job creation, and retention

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

SB 1 created this new program.

For additional information please see the CTC's Solutions for Congested Corridors Program page.

Accomplishments

11 construction contracts have been awarded and are expected to achieve these benefits:

  • 124 HOV/HOT Lanes
  • 35 miles/109 locations of traffic light synchronization
  • 20 railcars/ transit vehicles
  • 17 Intelligent Transportation System elements
  • 13 operational improvements
  • 9 miles of new track
  • 9 miles of pedestrian/bike facilities
  • 9 fixed modified/reconstructed bridges
  • 6.5 miles of soundwall
  • 6 station/bus stop improvements
  • Purchase 5 Zero Emission Vehicles

Local Partnership Local Partnership Program (LPP)

LPP was created by SB1 for local and regional transportation agencies to fund road maintenance and rehabilitation, sound walls, and other transportation improvement projects. LPP provides funds to local and regional transportation agencies that have passed transportation sales tax measures, developer fees, or other imposed transportation fees. The CTC distributes LPP funds through a 50 percent statewide formula (LPP-F) component and a 50 percent competitive component (LPP-C) for the first cycle. Funds from this program are used to improve aging infrastructure, repair road conditions, construct active transportation, and for health and safety projects. The CTC manages this program and Caltrans performs administrative and oversight program responsibilities.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

LPP is a new program created by SB 1 modeled as a similar program funded by Proposition 1B Bonds.

For additional information please see the CTC's Local Partnership Program page.

Accomplishments

17 competitive projects were awarded and are expected to achieve these benefits:

  • 51.2 miles of local road improvements
  • 50 signs, lights, greenway and other safety beautification
  • 40 transit vehicles
  • 30.4 HOV/HOT lane miles
  • 23 intersections modified
  • 11 pedestrian bicycle facilities
  • 10 operational improvements
  • 10 miles of new track
  • 7.8 miles of mixed flow lanes
  • 7 bicycle lane miles
  • 6 modified improved interchanges
  • 6 local road lane miles rehabilitated
  • 5.6 new roadway lane
  • 5 modified reconstructed bridges
  • 4 new stations
  • 3 auxiliary lane miles constructed
  • 2 station improvements
  • 2 new intersections constructed
  • 1.9 miles of sidewalk
  • 1 mile of turn pockets constructed

Active Transportation Active Transportation Program (ATP)

On September 26, 2013, Governor Brown signed legislation creating the Active Transportation Program (ATP) in the Department of Transportation (Senate Bill 99, Chapter 359 and Assembly Bill 101, Chapter 354). The ATP consolidates existing federal and state transportation programs, including the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), Bicycle Transportation Account (BTA), and State Safe Routes to School (SRTS), into a single program with a focus to make California a national leader in active transportation. The ATP is administered by the Division of Local Assistance, Office of State Programs.

The purpose of ATP is to encourage increased use of active modes of transportation by achieving the following goals:

  • Increase the proportion of trips accomplished by biking and walking
  • Increase safety and mobility for non-motorized users
  • Advance the active transportation efforts of regional agencies to achieve Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reduction goals, pursuant to SB 375 (of 2008) and SB 341 (of 2009)
  • Enhance public health
  • Ensure that disadvantaged communities fully share in the benefits of the program
  • Provide a broad spectrum of projects to benefit many types of active transportation users

SB 1 funding encourages increased use of active modes of transportation, such as biking and walking. Examples of ATP projects include: bikeways, sidewalks, trails, intersection improvements, crosswalks improvements, bike/pedestrian bridges, planning activities, and non-infrastructure activities such as education, enforcement and encouragement programs. The CTC manages this program and Caltrans performs administrative and oversight program responsibilities.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

The ATP program was established in 2013 and SB 1 augmented the funding to this existing program by adding $100 million annually.

For additional information please see Caltrans' Active Transportation Program page.

Accomplishments

contracts have been awarded and are expected to achieve these benefits:

  • 57 crosswalk enhancements
  • 47 new crosswalks
  • 25.6 miles of class 3 bike lanes
  • 27 programs (non-infrastructure benefits)
  • 21 planning plans
  • 4.6 miles of class 1 bike lanes
  • 3.7 miles of sidewalk enhancements
  • 2.98 miles of class 2 bike lanes
  • 0.8 miles of new sidewalks
  • 0.8 miles of new multi-use trails
  • 0.2 miles of class 4 bike lanes
  • 0.2 miles of multi-use trail enhancements

Transit and Intercity Rail Transit and Intercity Rail Program (TIRCP)

The Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) was created to fund transformative capital projects that modernize California’s intercity rail, bus, ferry and rail transit systems. SB 1 provides an increase in stable funding for transit and rail capital projects under TIRCP. The program requires projects to meet specific criteria, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and requires 25 percent to be awarded to disadvantaged communities. Caltrans performs administrative and oversight project responsibilities, and the California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA) selects the projects on a competitive process based on the following objectives:

  1. Projects that will reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.
  2. Projects that will expand and improve transit service to increase ridership.
  3. Projects that will integrate the rail service of the State’s various rail operations, including integration with the high-speed rail system.
  4. Projects that will improve transit safety.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

The TIRCP was created by SB 862 (Committee on Budget and fiscal Review, Chapter 36, Statutes of 2014) and modified by SB 9 (Beall, chapter 710, Statutes of 2015) to continuously appropriate to CalSTA Cap-and-Trade auction proceeds to fund transformative capital improvements that will modernize California’s intercity, commuter and urban rail, and bus and ferry transit systems. Cap-and-Trade auction proceeds are deposited into the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (GGRF). SB 1 added an average of $300 million annually to this existing program.

For additional information please see the California State Transportation Agency's Transit and Intercity Rail Program page.

Accomplishments

Cycle 3, Awarded in April 2018, $4.325 billion*

  • $1.05 billion has been allocated to 25 of 28 projects
  • 18 of 28, or 64 percent of projects, are currently in construction**
  • 6 more projects are anticipated to be in construction by June 2021
  • 26 of 28 projects are located within priority populations***
  • An estimated 31,942,000 metric tons of CO2e (MTCO2e) will be reduced

*$2.65 billion for 21 projects over 5 years & an additional $1.675 billion for 7 projects over 10 years.
**Third party contract awarded for a construction phase. Procurement of vehicles considered as construction. Excludes Network Integration contracts.
***Priority Populations contribute direct, meaningful and assured benefits to disadvantaged communities, low-income communities or low-income households.

Cycle 4, Awarded in April 2020, $500 million

  • $30 million has been allocated since April award announcement, with $60 million more in allocations anticipated by June 2021
  • 6 of 17 projects will have construction allocations by June 2021, with seven more projects receiving allocations for pre-construction phases
  • All 17 projects are located in priority populations
  • An estimated 5,016,000 metric tons of CO2e (MTCO2e) will be reduced

State Rail Assistance State Rail Assistance Program

SB 1 created the State Rail Assistance Program for local agencies to fund operations and capital expenditures for commuter and intercity rail agencies. Projects funded by this program include capital and operations to expand service, enhance customer amenities, and promote capital investments in rolling stock, track, and station improvements.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

The State Rail Assistance Program was created by SB 1.

For additional information please see the California State Transportation Agency's State Rail Assistance Program page.

Accomplishments

There are 35 projects in this program. Accomplishments are as follows:

  • 43 stations improved
  • 5 locomotives replaced with Tier 4 models
  • 26 locomotives maintained*
  • 121 railcars maintained*
  • 37 new EMUs purchased
  • 3 platforms built or improved
  • 6 rail infrastructure improvements**

* Various components repaired or replaced
** Signals replaced, sidings added or extended, new track laid, new crossovers and derails installed

State of Good Repair State of Good Repair Program (SGR)

What type of projects are funded by SGR funds?

The State of Good Repair Program was created to provide a consistent and dependable revenue source to transit operators to invest in the upgrade, repair, and improvement of their respective agency’s existing transportation infrastructure and services. Examples of projects include:

  • transit capital projects,
  • services to maintain or repair existing transit fleets and facilities,
  • new vehicles or facilities that improve existing transit services, and
  • transit services that complement local efforts to repair and improve local transportation infrastructure.

Caltrans manages and administers this program.

Projects in the SGR program are expected to achieve benefits in these categories:

  • Improved Safety
  • Increased Useful Life
  • Efficiency
  • Environmental Resources Conservation
  • System Preservation - Increase reliability
  • Accessibility
  • Mobility
  • Economic Impacts

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

SB 1 created the State of Good Repair Program to supplement the State Transit Assistance Program with a focus on rehabilitation.

For additional information please see Catrans' State of Good Repair Program page.

Accomplishments

The SGR Program has allocated $318.9 million to 388 projects and when completed are expected to achieve the following benefits:

  • 150 rolling stock/fleet
  • 50 passenger facilities
  • 48 operational equipment
  • 42 operations facilities
  • 32 maintenance facilities
  • 28 maintenance equipment
  • 27 other improvements
  • 4 commuter rail
  • 4 ferry
  • 3 light rail

Transportation Planning Grants Transportation Planning Grants

SB 1 requires that funds are made available for planning grants to strengthen the economy, promote equity and protect the environment as follows:

  • Sustainable communities’ grants are intended for regional multimodal transportation and land use planning projects which support regional sustainable community strategies and help achieve California’s greenhouse gas reduction targets.
  • Adaptation planning grants are intended to help local and regional agencies conduct adaptation planning to ensure transportation assets are resilient in the face of climate change and extreme weather events.

Sustainable Communities Grants

Funding is available to encourage local and regional planning that further goals and best practices cited in the regional transportation guidelines adopted by the CTC. Caltrans developed a grant guide in consultation with the State Air Resources Board, the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research, and the Department of Housing and Community Development.

Adaptation Planning Grants

Funding is available for local adaptation planning grants to support actions at the local and regional levels that advance climate change efforts on the transportation system.

Did Senate Bill 1 create this program?

SB 1 created this new grant program.

For additional information please see Catrans' Sustainable Transportation Planning Grants page.

Accomplishments

2021-22 Grants

  • Grant application guide was updated and released with public and stakeholder input
  • Call for applications in the fall 2020
  • Awards will be announced in Spring 2021
Sustainable Communities 2019-20 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21
Formula Grants 38 $12.5 M 32 $12.5 M
Competitive Grants 36 $12.4 M 43 $12.4 M
Totals 74 $24.9 M 75 $24.9 M

Adaptation Grants

Awarded planning projects are expected to finish in 2020 and 2021

Adaptation Planning 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Total
Number of Grants 20 22 18 60
Dollars $6.9 M $7.1 M $6 M $20 M

Research Research

SB 1 provides funds for the University of California (UC) campuses and California State University (CSU) campuses currently performing transportation research. UCs receive $5 million annually and CSUs receive $2 million annually for transportation research.

California State University (CSU)

The California State University Transportation Consortium (CSUTC), led by the Mineta Transportation Institute at San José State University, works across the CSU system to engage in impactful transportation research and workforce development initiatives. The CSUTC conducts research that ensures the efficient movement of people and products, while preparing a new cohort of transportation professionals who are ready to lead a more diverse, inclusive, and equitable transportation industry.

University of California (UC)

The University of California Institute of Transportation Studies (UC ITS) is a network of faculty, research and administrative staff, and students dedicated to advancing the state of the art in transportation engineering, planning, and policy to provide California, the nation, and the world lasting societal benefits. Established in 1947 by the California Legislature, the UC ITS has branches at UC Berkeley, UC Irvine, UC Davis, and UCLA. Each branch operates as an independent and distinct research center in addition to collaborating on a California-focused, statewide research program funded by the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (SB 1) and the Public Transportation Account. Learn more about the UC ITS' research program.

Research Accomplishments

California State University (CSU)

For updates on research completed by the California State University Transportation Consortium (CSUTC) please see: California State University Transportation Consortium Research Program.

University of California (UC)

For updates on research completed by the University of California Institute of Transportation Studies (UC ITS) please see: UC Institute of Transportation Studies Research Program.

Caltrans Advanced Mitigation Caltrans Advanced Mitigation Program

The Caltrans Advance Mitigation Program (Program) was established by the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 authorizing Caltrans to plan and implement advance mitigation solutions for its future transportation projects. This new business practice allows Caltrans to reduce delays by proactively obtaining environmental mitigation in advance of - rather than during - transportation projects.

The primary goal of the Program is to address longer-term future environmental mitigation needs resulting in improved environmental, economic and project delivery outcomes. By consolidating the forecasted mitigation needs of multiple future transportation projects, Caltrans can potentially provide strategically placed and environmentally sound replacement habitat and shorten project delivery timelines, resulting in both time and cost savings. Ultimately, the Program aims to help Caltrans meet conservation goals in addition to regulatory requirements.

Accomplishments

Updates in progress.