SB 1 OVERVIEW

SB 1 is a landmark transportation investment to rebuild California by fixing neighborhood streets, freeways and bridges in communities across California and targeting funds toward transit and congested trade and commute corridor improvements. SB 1 is a job creator, the White House Council of Economic Advisors found that every $1 billion invested in transportation infrastructure supports 13,000 jobs a year. SB 1 is putting people to work rebuilding California.

  1. SB1 invests $5.4 billion annually over the next decade to fix California’s transportation system. It will address a backlog of repairs and upgrades, while ensuring a cleaner and more sustainable travel network for the future.
  2. SB1 funds will be protected under a constitutional amendment (ACA 5) which safeguards new dollars for transportation use only. ACA 5 will be on the ballot for voter approval in November 2018.

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO?

California’s state-maintained transportation infrastructure will receive roughly half of SB 1 revenue: $26 billion. The other half will go to local roads, transit agencies and an expansion of the state’s growing network of pedestrian and cycle routes. Each year, this new funding will be used to tackle deferred maintenance needs both on the state highway system and the local road system, including:

maintenance and rehabilitation

Maintenance and Rehabilitation of the State Highway System: $1.8 billion

transit

New Funding to Transit Agencies to help them increase access and service and build capital projects: over $750 million

culverts and drains

Maintaining and Repairing the State’s Bridges and Culverts: $400 million

trade corridors

Trade Corridor Enhancement Program: $300 million

Money from this new program will fund freight projects along important trade corridor routes.

local streets and roads

Repairs to Local Streets and Roads: $1.5 billion

congestion relief

Solutions for Congested Corridors Program: $250 million

Money from this new program will go to projects from regional agencies and the state that will improve traffic flow and mobility along the state’s most congested routes while also seeking to improve air quality and health.

local matching funds

Matching Funds for Local Agencies: $200 million

This money will go to local entities who are already making their own extra investment in transportation. These matching funds will support the efforts of cities and counties with voter-approved transportation tax measures.

local planning grants

Local Planning Grants: $25 million

Addresses community needs by providing support for planning that may have previously lacked funding, good planning will increase the value of transportation investments.

bike and pedestrian

Bike and Pedestrian Projects: $100 million

This will go to cities, counties and regional transportation agencies to build or convert more bike paths, crosswalks and sidewalks. It is a significant increase in funding for these projects through the Active Transportation Program (ATP).

transportation related research

Transportation-Related Research at state universities: $7 million

Research will help identify cost-effective materials and methods to improve the benefits of transportation investments.

freeway service patrol

Freeway Service Patrol: $25 million

Assists stranded motorists on the most congested freeways to keep drivers moving during peak hours.

workforce training

Workforce Training Programs: $5 million

Every $1 billion spent on infrastructure projects creates more than 13,000 jobs, according to federal government estimates. California needs to ensure there is a ready workforce to carry out these transportation projects coming down the way.